I make websites for a living, mostly for @kpbs. I live in North Park San Diego with 3 pitbulls. All opinions expressed are MY OWN.
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Did Kim Jong-Un Wear Platform Shoes?

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Here at Put This On, we strive to bring you the most insightful and critical analysis on men’s style and clothing. So today, we ask the hard questions: did Kim Jong-Un break out the extra wide pants yesterday for his summit with President Trump? And if so, was it to hide his extra tall platform shoes?

Observe.

Kim Jong-Un doesn’t always wear wide-legged pants, although he has some in his wardrobe. For a light and cheerful summery look, sometimes he wears grey trousers that taper to the hem. Other times, he favors wider trousers that would make designers Christophe Lemaire and Patrick Grant blush.

 

 

Yesterday’s summit was a serious event — a formal occasion — so naturally, Kim went with a more traditional 50″ leg opening to signal that he was here for business. But could there have been an ulterior motive for wearing such engulfing trousers? Here’s Kim at the beginning of the summit, gleefully enjoying his wide legged trousers — the swishing, free-flowing fabric whipping between his legs, signaling to slim-fit newbs that he’s not afraid of more adventurous silhouettes.

 

 

During the photo-op with President Trump, however, the massive, absolute-unit of a leg opening rode up on Kim mid-stride, revealing what was a very peculiar looking oxford. The facings, which are the part of the shoe that hold the eyelets, stand pretty far from the sole. Unusually so, if you compare the distance against your own shoes. The heel cup, similarly, is pretty damn tall.

 

 

Did Kim wear platform shoes for his meeting with President Trump? Our research on Google dot com reveals that Kim Jong-Un stands at 5′ 7″, Donald Trump reports he’s 6′ 3″ (although his real height is contentious. Here he is standing next to Obama, who’s 6’1″). Figure that’s about a six to eight inch difference, depending on who you believe.

Nicholas Templeman, a London-based bespoke shoemaker who trained at John Lobb, tells us that he thinks Kim’s shoes have lifts — a wedge-shaped insert that brings the wearer’s heel up, making the person look taller (think of how women’s heels work). Templeman estimates they’re about an inch high here. “That’s quite a bit. You won’t get much more than that without extending right to the front of the foot like a platform shoe,” he says. “I do my best to talk people out of it. If you do a more discrete 1/4″ lift, it makes no difference. But at the point it matters, it becomes too noticeable.”

Unless you wear massive, Electric Daisy Carnival, wool gabardine trousers that envelop 9/10ths of your feet, hiding them entirely. Another point for swishy pants.

The post Did Kim Jong-Un Wear Platform Shoes? appeared first on Put This On.

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jtinsky
9 days ago
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San Diego, CA
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Nothing Cuts Costs (or Carbs) Like Zucchini: Three Recipes for Summer’s Unsung Garden Hero

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Zucchini aren’t pretty, don’t stand out in a produce aisle, and don’t get as fussed over in gardens as tomatoes or berries, but these summer squash are peerless in reducing your waistline and budget.

I’ll admit, I wasn’t overly impressed four years ago when my wife told me that she was planting zucchini in our garden. I’d grown up in an Italian-American household in New Jersey where zucchini took a back row in my grandfather’s garden behind tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, basil, oregano, and even mint. If my family could use any other produce, it would, and the zucchini would either wither on the vine or be eliminated from a year of planting entirely.

But today, this versatile fruit is a garden staple in our home and a vital part of both out diet and our weekly produce bill. A summer squash of the curcubita pepo species, the zucchini has its roots in the Americas and was developed in Italy in the early 1900s after being brought over in the mid-19th century, only to come back in its newest form when Italians immigrated to the U.S. in the 1920s.

Based on that background, my family should’ve loved it and I should have known more about it than I did during our first zucchini harvest in 2014. My wife had grown a bed of zucchini from a 3-gram, $3 bag of seeds from Territorial Seed and the plants just wouldn’t stop producing. Each day she looked beneath the leaves, another fully-formed zucchini would show up. By the time she reached some of them, they were so overgrown and woody that they were good for little but decor.

We ended up with wheelbarrows full of them, which led to a question: What do you do with zucchini? Well, at their prime eating size, zucchini have all of 31 calories and 7 grams of carbohydrates, with 2 grams of that coming from dietary fiber. They have minimal sugar content, minimal fat, and 58 percent of your recommended daily dose of Vitamin C.

That all sounds great, but we struggled to find a use for them. Cutting them into spears and grilling them was a fine option, but they lack all that much flavor of their own and tended to just turn into seasoned sides. We would bake zucchini rounds as side dishes, but it felt as if we could be doing a lot more. When we decided to start eliminating carbohydrates from our diet, we discovered that we could do a lot more with them.

It turns out that zucchini’s rigid-but-pliable structure makes it an excellent substitute for pasta when drained. Using a spiral slicer (the only one you’ll need is all of $7 on Amazon), we began experimenting with pasta and stir-fry recipes and taking flour and whole-grain noodles out of the equation.

Not only was home-grown zucchini less expensive than a $1 box of spaghetti or linguine at Safeway, but one zucchini (79 cents at Safeway, by the way) produced roughly as many noodles as a pound of pasta while containing a fraction of that box of pasta’s 200 calories and 42 carbohydrates. It also turns out that a simple mandoline slicer ($5 at Amazon) can turn zucchini into flat lasagna noodles without the $2.19 price tag at Safeway or the 200 calories and 42 carbs. While some cooks will note that eggplant can perform the same function as eggplant parmigiana, zucchini doesn’t have eggplant’s 132 calories, 32 grams of carbohydrates, or whopping 13 grams of sugar.

As others note, however, “zoodles” are the least of zucchini’s healthier uses. Sure, it helps a great deal with pasta dishes, but its health benefits extend to riced zucchini (which we’ll admit is second only to riced cauliflower as a replacement), zucchini fries, and, our favorite, shredded zucchini that can substitute for flour ($3.29 for five pounds and 110 calories, 22 carbohydrates) in a baking recipe. We’ve even used them as a substitute for tortillas ($3.99 for 16, with 144 calories, 4 grams of fat, 24 grams of carbohydrates, 293 milligrams of sodium) in enchiladas.

There are a lot of ways to cut the grocery bill or go low-carb, but the zucchini gives you the most for the least. Plant starts are roughly $5 at Home Depot if you don’t have the patience for seeds. Meanwhile, just one plant will produce six to 10 pounds of zucchini in a single growing season.

To give you a better idea of what we’ll be making from our zucchini patch this year and what’s possible from your crop, here are just a few recipes from our recipe book to get you started.

Zucchini Enchiladas

Source: Delish.com

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups chicken
  • 2 tsp chili powder
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 1/3 cup of enchilada sauce, red
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 large onion
  • 4 large zucchini
  • 1 tbsp olive oil, extra-virgin
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup shredded monterrey jack cheese
  • Sour cream for drizzling
  • Fresh cilantro for garnish

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large skillet over medium heat, heat oil. Add onion and season with salt. Cook until soft, 5 minutes, then add garlic, cumin and chili powder and stir until combined. Add shredded chicken and 1 cup enchilada sauce and stir until saucy.

2. On a cutting board, make thin slices of zucchini with a vegetable peeler. Lay out three, slightly overlapping, and place a spoonful of chicken mixture on top. Roll up and transfer to a baking dish. Repeat with remaining zucchini and chicken mixture.

3. Spoon remaining 1/3 cup enchilada sauce over zucchini enchiladas and sprinkle with both cheeses.

4. Bake until melted, 20 minutes.

5. Garnish with sour cream and cilantro and serve.

Thai Chicken Zucchini Noodles with Spicy Peanut Sauce

Source: Joyful Healthy Eats 

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons of grape seed oil
  • 1 lb. of chicken tenders, diced
  • 2 tablespoons of grape seed oil
  • 2 zucchini, inspiralized
  • 1 large carrot, inspiralized
  • 1 red pepper, julienned
  • 1/3 cup of bean sprouts
  • 1/4 cup of fresh cilantro, diced
  • 1/4 cup of green onions, diced
  • Sesame seeds (for garnish)

For spicy peanut sauce:

  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 4 tablespoons of peanut butter
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 3 tablespoons of coconut aminos (or tamari sauce)
  • 2 tablespoons of fresh cilantro, diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon of ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon of red pepper flakes

Directions:

1. In a small bowl, whisk together garlic, peanut butter, coconut aminos, lime juice, ground ginger, and red pepper flakes. Set aside. (Note: If you use tamari sauce, use 2 tablespoons instead of 3.)

2. Heat a large skillet to medium high heat. Add grape seed oil and chicken tenders. Saute each side for 3-4 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit. Dice when cooled.

3. In the same large skillet over medium high heat, add 2 tablespoons of grape seed oil, zucchini noodles, and carrot noodles. Flash stir fry for 2 minutes, stirring constantly.

4. Remove noodles and place in large bowl along with chicken, red pepper, bean sprouts, fresh cilantro, green onions, and spicy peanut sauce. Toss till all noodles are coated.

5. Serve and garnish with sesame seeds.

Cheesy Garlic Zucchini Bread (or Biscuits)

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups flour
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 cup shredded zucchini
  • 3/4 cup shredded cheddar
  • 1/4 cup green onion
  • 1 tablespoon of fresh dill or 2 teaspoons dry dill
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 4 tablespoons melted butter

Directions:

1. Set oven to 350 degrees; combine dry ingredients.

2. Combine zucchini, cheese, onion and dill.

3. Toss both mixes together to coat zucchini.

4. Whisk eggs, butter, and milk together. Mix with dry mix until just combined.

5. Bake in small bread loaf pan for 30 minutes, regular bread loaf pan for 50 minutes, or in biscuits on baking sheet for 15 minutes.

Related Articles:

The post Nothing Cuts Costs (or Carbs) Like Zucchini: Three Recipes for Summer’s Unsung Garden Hero appeared first on The Simple Dollar.

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jtinsky
10 days ago
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San Diego, CA
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A South L.A. apartment gets the celebrity treatment

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It would take less than 90 minutes for volunteers from A Sense of Home, a charitable organization that helps former foster-care children furnish their first apartment, to turn the empty interior into a home.

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jtinsky
15 days ago
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San Diego, CA
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1834: The First Cyberattack

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Tom Standage has a great story of the first cyberattack against a telegraph network.

The Blanc brothers traded government bonds at the exchange in the city of Bordeaux, where information about market movements took several days to arrive from Paris by mail coach. Accordingly, traders who could get the information more quickly could make money by anticipating these movements. Some tried using messengers and carrier pigeons, but the Blanc brothers found a way to use the telegraph line instead. They bribed the telegraph operator in the city of Tours to introduce deliberate errors into routine government messages being sent over the network.

The telegraph's encoding system included a "backspace" symbol that instructed the transcriber to ignore the previous character. The addition of a spurious character indicating the direction of the previous day's market movement, followed by a backspace, meant the text of the message being sent was unaffected when it was written out for delivery at the end of the line. But this extra character could be seen by another accomplice: a former telegraph operator who observed the telegraph tower outside Bordeaux with a telescope, and then passed on the news to the Blancs. The scam was only uncovered in 1836, when the crooked operator in Tours fell ill and revealed all to a friend, who he hoped would take his place. The Blanc brothers were put on trial, though they could not be convicted because there was no law against misuse of data networks. But the Blancs' pioneering misuse of the French network qualifies as the world's first cyber-attack.

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jtinsky
18 days ago
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The U.S. Army calculates exact amount of coffee necessary for alertness

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The military announced a new algorithm that tells you exactly when and how much coffee to consume.

The U.S. Army has finally relieved of us of that nagging mid-morning dilemma, the one in which you debate: Should I have another cup of coffee?

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jtinsky
18 days ago
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San Diego, CA
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Lockdown

15 Comments and 42 Shares

Officially, Google killed Reader because “over the years usage has declined”.1 I believe that statement, especially if API clients weren’t considered “usage”, but I don’t believe belive that’s the entire reason.

The most common assumption I’ve seen others cite is that “Google couldn’t figure out how to monetize Reader,” or other variants about direct profitability. I don’t believe this, either. Google Reader’s operational costs likely paled in comparison to many of their other projects that don’t bring in major revenue, and I’ve heard from multiple sources that it effectively had a staff of zero for years. It was just running, quietly serving a vital role for a lot of people.

This is how RSS and Atom have always worked: you put in some effort up front to get the system built,2 and in most instances, you never need to touch it. It just hums along, immune to redesigns, changing APIs, web-development trends, and slash-and-burn executives on “sunsetting” sprees.3

RSS was the original web-service API. The original mashup enabler. And it’s still healthy and going strong.

Mostly.

RSS grew up in a boom time for consumer web services and truly open APIs, but it especially spread like wildfire in the blogging world. Personal blogs and RSS represented true vendor independence: you could host your site anywhere, with any software. You could change those whenever anything started to suck, because there were many similar choices and your readers could always find your site at the domain name you owned.

The free, minimally restricted web-service-API era has come and gone since then. As Jeremy Keith wrote so well a few weeks ago (you should read the whole thing), those days aren’t coming back:

But [Facebook] did grow. And grow. And grow. And suddenly the AOL business model didn’t seem so crazy anymore. It seemed ahead of its time.

Once Facebook had proven that it was possible to be the one-stop-shop for your user’s every need, that became the model to emulate. Startups stopped seeing themselves as just one part of a bigger web. Now they wanted to be the only service that their users would ever need… just like Facebook.

Seen from that perspective, the open flow of information via APIs — allowing data to flow porously between services — no longer seemed like such a good idea.

(He also addresses RSS. Read it. I’ll wait here.)

This isn’t an issue of “openness”, per se — Twitter, for instance, has very good reasons to limit its API. You aren’t entitled to unrestricted access to someone else’s service. Those days are gone for good, and we’ll all be fine. We don’t need big web players to be completely open.

The bigger problem is that they’ve abandoned interoperability. RSS, semantic markup, microformats, and open APIs all enable interoperability, but the big players don’t want that — they want to lock you in, shut out competitors, and make a service so proprietary that even if you could get your data out, it would be either useless (no alternatives to import into) or cripplingly lonely (empty social networks).

Google resisted this trend admirably for a long time and was very geek- and standards-friendly, but not since Facebook got huge enough to effectively redefine redefined the internet and refocus Google’s plans to be all-Google+, all the time.4 The escalating three-way war between Google, Facebook, and Twitter — by far the three most important web players today — is accumulating new casualties every day at our expense.

Google Reader is just the latest casualty of the war that Facebook started, seemingly accidentally: the battle to own everything.5 While Google did technically “own” Reader and could make some use of the huge amount of news and attention data flowing through it, it conflicted with their far more important Google+ strategy: they need everyone reading and sharing everything through Google+ so they can compete with Facebook for ad-targeting data, ad dollars, growth, and relevance.

RSS represents the antithesis of this new world: it’s completely open, decentralized, and owned by nobody, just like the web itself. It allows anyone, large or small, to build something new and disrupt anyone else they’d like because nobody has to fly six salespeople out first to work out a partnership with anyone else’s salespeople.

That world formed the web’s foundations — without that world to build on, Google, Facebook, and Twitter couldn’t exist. But they’ve now grown so large that everything from that web-native world is now a threat to them, and they want to shut it down. “Sunset” it. “Clean it up.” “Retire” it. Get it out of the way so they can get even bigger and build even bigger proprietary barriers to anyone trying to claim their territory.

Well, fuck them, and fuck that.

We need to keep pushing forward without them, and do what we’ve always done before: route around the obstructions and maintain what’s great about the web. Keep building and supporting new tools, technologies, and platforms to empower independence, interoperability, and web property ownership.


  1. Over the years, comma usage after prepositional phrases has also apparently declined.

  2. Then you spend twice as much time figuring out how to deal with poorly crafted feeds, ambiguities, and edge cases — especially for Atom, which is a huge, overengineered pain in the ass that, as far as I can tell, exists mostly because people always argue with Dave Winer and do their own contrarian things even when he’s right, because they can’t stand when he’s right.

  3. They never hear about it, and don’t know what it is if someone starts explaining it. To most “business” people, RSS might as well be NTP or SMB. “Something the servers do.”

  4. This plan is particularly problematic because Google+ is, relatively, a clear failure so far.

  5. Apple dragged Google into a similar war for extreme mobile-OS lockdown — that’s why Google had to do Android.

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jtinsky
1812 days ago
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San Diego, CA
chrisamico
1816 days ago
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Boston, MA
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14 public comments
esch
1809 days ago
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Well, fuck them, and fuck that.
Minneapolis, Minnesota
brico
1816 days ago
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+1
Brooklyn, NY
subbes
1816 days ago
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Tch, eh?
SF Bay Area
KimKane
1816 days ago
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historical perspective on death of G Reader
MotherHydra
1816 days ago
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Slowly the net is regressing back to the days of information silos controlled by a few, big players. Fight the future, I say. I don't miss AOL's mono-culture and I sure won't miss Facebook when it finally dies. I hope that Google reaps the karma from killing off reader, especially since they moved into the RSS space and nearly killed it off. Oddly enough it was an evil move to begin with, but no one wants to discuss that minor point. Glad RSS survived Google's scorched-earth policy.
Space City, USA
hooges
1816 days ago
I agree. He makes a point in this article about how we don't need the big players to be open - that is crazy! We do need them to be MORE open because otherwise we are regressing.
pberry
1816 days ago
I'm not convinced the numbers support that. You would be hard pressed at this very moment to say that there isn't more open content now than in the past.
phrakture
1816 days ago
I agree with pberry. This whole thing stinks of "oh the times were so much better *back then*".
skorgu
1816 days ago
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Sigh.
petrilli
1816 days ago
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Standards will set you free. Unfortunately, most people don't actually want to be free.
Arlington, VA
clinthowarth
1816 days ago
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Excellent and depressing summary. Marco is a smart guy.
Cafeine
1816 days ago
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Views on WHY (really) Google killed reader.
Paris / France
bluegecko
1816 days ago
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This is, by far, the best analysis I've seen of why Google killed Reader, and includes some great insights into the general ecosystem, too.
New York, NY
rosskarchner
1816 days ago
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I really wish there were some sort of 'like' button I could click to signal my approval here.
DC-ish
wingnut2600
1816 days ago
(liked)
ichdarfdas
1817 days ago
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Now is the time to take back the Internet, one feed at a time.
octplane
1817 days ago
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Nice article...
Paris
kicking_kk
1817 days ago
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Excellent article on the philosophy behind the Google Reader shutdown. This is why I support app.net & Newsblur.
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